Projects / JPPF

JPPF

JPPF makes it easy to parallelize computationally intensive tasks and execute them on a Grid.

Tags
Licenses
Operating Systems
Implementation
Translations

RSS Recent releases

  •  16 Apr 2014 20:10

Release Notes: This maintenance release brings important bug fixes and enhancements.

  •  30 Mar 2014 16:49

Release Notes: The values of the configuration properties can now be scripted. A priority can be assigned to the local executor and auto-discovered connections. The driver management port is directly provided to the client during the connection handshake. Tasks can now schedule themselves for resubmission.

  •  30 Mar 2014 16:49

Release Notes: This maintenance release brings important bugfixes and enhancements.

  •  03 Mar 2014 20:06

Release Notes: This v4.1 pre-release brings exciting new features, including a node provisioning facility, the ablity to define complex connection and failover strategies for the nodes, and variable substitutions in the configuration.

Release Notes: This maintenance release brings important bugfixes and documentation enhancements.

RSS Recent comments

28 Dec 2007 03:02 lolocohen Thumbs up

Re: what is its relationship to clustering (e.g. JBoss)?
Hello Jamie,

Thank you for your comments and question.

Indeed, JPPF is not a cluster, but rather a computational grid framework.

The generally agreed upon difference between clusters and grids is that clusters are made of a set of tightly coupled, homogeneous systems (hardware/OS/software) in a single location or complex, whereas grids are loosely coupled, heterogeneous and widely distributed in nature.

In a larger definition, a grid provides access to computational and storage resources across organizational boundaries. In effect, it virtualizes these resources from the user's perspective, as the user doesn't need to know what these resources are made of or where they are located to use them.

A J2EE application server such as JBoss provides clustering capabilities. Its main goal is to serve a large number of relatively short-lived interactions (or transactions) with a large number of users.

On the other hand, a computational grid will serve requests for long-lived intensive computations that can take hours or days or even longer to complete.

In short, frameworks like JBoss and JPPF provide capabilities in different areas, where they do not compete with each other. It is my belief that they instead complement each other. To demonstrate this, we (JPPF team) have developed a connector between JPPF and the major J2EE application servers in the market, including JBoss.

I invite you to find more about it on the JPPF web site at www.jppf.org

I hope this answers your question,

-Laurent

> This project sounds very interesting. My

> question is: what is its relationship

> with clustering setup for example in

> JBoss? Is it a similar thing but in a

> new development? or is it complete a new

> technology?

27 Dec 2007 10:30 jamiescott66

what is its relationship to clustering (e.g. JBoss)?
This project sounds very interesting. My question is: what is its relationship with clustering setup for example in JBoss? Is it a similar thing but in a new development? or is it complete a new technology?

Screenshot

Project Spotlight

Tardis

A TimeMachine style backup system for Linux.

Screenshot

Project Spotlight

Text2GUI

A program that generates Java GUIs from natural language.